Tuesday, November 25, 2014

App Smashing & Differentiation

I have been having a great time sharing two of my favorite apps with elementary schools. I always start by telling the teachers I am going to model how they can use one iPad in a classroom as a center. 

I gave the teachers a blank coloring page from colAR Mix. I usually print the colAR Dot Day because that is the easiest to color in the amount of time we have during teacher planning times. After the teachers color the page, we then open the colAR Mix app. After the image became 3D within the app, we took a picture of it.


We opened the Write About This app and went to Quick Write which is one of the six options available within the app. We added our 3D image to the page. The teachers then told or wrote a story about their image.

What I love to tell teachers is how differentiation is built into this app. Underneath the picture, students can record their voice telling the story, instead of typing the story. So cool! What is even cooler is when they click to start typing the story, the keyboard opens and on the keyboard (with iOS 8.1.1) there is a microphone icon. When a student presses that icon, they can speak and the program types their story for them! How awesome is that? So those students who have a little trouble typing, can just dictate their story. I love this and the teachers love it also.

Another thing that I showed the teachers is that if they click on Random within the Write About This app, some pictures with writing prompts open up. There is a speaker that will read the prompt to a student, and from there they can type or record their own voice responding to the prompt. Also, under settings, teachers can choose to differentiate by changing the level of the writing prompt.


I used two different apps and smashed them together (thus, app smashing). I differentiated by showing how students could record their voice instead of typing. 




Tuesday, May 6, 2014

Chromville

Today I came across an Augmented Reality app on Pinterest. This one is called ChromVille. It is free and you can find it in both the App Store and Google Play. 

After downloading the app, go to the website Chromville and print the pages for coloring. Right now they only have 1 page per chapter. If you subscribe to their web page, you might get more chapter pages.

Here is one that I did:


I think it is so cool to see something flat and with the help of an app, see it in 3D. That is just awesome!

So, how would you use it in education? I think a wonderful and imaginative story could be developed using these pictures. This would be great as a story starter for any age student. This could also be used with other apps (such as ChatterPix 4 Kids or Tellagami) to tell a story.

What are ways that you would use this?

Friday, May 2, 2014

Creative Thinking Prompt #30

My friend and co-worker Melissa Edwards posted on her blog "Figuring out how the Pieces Fit ..." a Creative Thinking Prompt Challenge on finding images that represent the 4 C's to me. I read her blog post and looked at her pictures. This got me to thinking about what I would use.

Challenge accepted!

Here are my pictures of the 4 C's:





These are pictures I took or made and then I imported them into PicMonkey, created a collage, and added the text. 

Thanks Melissa for making me think this morning!

Thursday, May 1, 2014

Writing Notes Using an iPad

I just came across this app on Twitter and downloaded it. It is called Notability. Right now the app is free in iTunes. Notability can be used on both the iPad and iPhone.

I like this app a lot. I like that I can change the position of the note from vertical to horizontal. I have been using Penultimate (free). I like that Penultimate syncs directly to Evernote. However, Penultimate makes me use their notebooks vertically and I can't change the position. Notability allows me to share my notes by email, Dropbox, Google Drive and many other ways.

Another favorite of mine with Notability is that I can choose different types of paper, both color and unlined, lined, or graph. With Penultimate I can choose different types of lined paper (narrow or wide) or graph paper, but I can't change the color of the paper. I know that the color of the paper may not be important to you, but sometimes I just feel like using a different color of paper!

Both apps allow you to add images to your notebooks. However, Notability also allows you to record voice notes. You can also type your notes in Notability.

Both apps have value for education because it allows students to take notes from their device. I think Notability may have a slight edge because it would also allow students to record specific things from their teacher as well as writing down or sketching out what the teacher is saying.

I am not sure which one I will use the most, but I will have fun trying both of them out!

Thursday, March 27, 2014

Dive into Art!


I recently read a blog post by Richard Byrne on "Seven Registration-Free Drawing Tools for Students" (Free Technology for Teachers). One really cool thing about these drawing tools is that they are all web-based and students do not have to have a log-in to start drawing.

My favorite is Bomomo. When you go to that web site, you have a blank screen with circles moving around. Your mouse controls the circles. At the bottom of the screen are all sorts of patterns that you can use to create art. As you choose different patterns, different colors are chosen also. 

Below is my art from Bomomo. I think it turned out pretty well.


One of the really cool things is that after creating your art work, you can then save it. I uploaded this art into PicMonkey and added my name to the artwork. (By the way, PicMonkey is another website that you don't have to register for and parts of it is free!)

Go and find your inner artist!

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Have You Ever Looked at Cloud Shapes?

Today on Twitter someone posted a TED Talk. This TED Talk was by Gavin Pretor-Pinney: Cloudy with a Chance of Joy. Now why would I blog about that? Watch the TED Talk below and see what comes to your mind!




 A couple of things that I really liked was when Gavin was talking about unplugging from everything and just laying back and watching the clouds. He talked about several cloud formations and that got me to thinking about different science standards and how they have to do with cloud shapes. Wouldn't showing this video be a good idea for introducing a unit on clouds? I think so!

The grade levels and the content standards are listed below:

7th Grade: 7.E.1.4 Predict weather conditions and patterns based on information obtained from:
  • Weather data collected from direct observations and measurement (wind speed and direction, air temperature, humidity and air pressure)
  • Weather maps, satellites and radar
  • Cloud shapes and types and associated elevation

5th Grade: 5.E.1 Understand weather patterns and phenomena, making connections to the weather in a particular place and time.
  •  5.E.1.3 Explain how global patterns such as the jet stream and water currents influence local weather in measurable terms such as temperature, wind direction and speed, and precipitation. 
Another great idea is using Wonderopolis. They have a great wonder of the day #591: What is a Lenticular Cloud?

One idea of how this could be used in the classroom would be as an introduction to your unit. Watch Gavin's TED Talk at the beginning of the unit, then give students an assignment to just look at the clouds they see (maybe over a weekend). They could also take pictures of these clouds to identify later. Another idea is after taking these pictures and identifying the different types of clouds, they could blog about the cloud and maybe mention what type of shape they saw in the clouds.

How will you see joy in the shapes of clouds?

Wednesday, December 19, 2012

Can't Get Enough of Reading!


Here are some great reading resources. These resources can be a great resource to share with parents also.

Remember Reading is Fundamental? The website reads books to students. There are reading logs, activities, games, and lesson plans. Parents will have to help students under 13 to join the RIF club.

We Give Books is a resource that teachers can use to read books on IWB (interactive white boards). Teachers will have to join (it is free) in order to read all the books. Here are some activities that go with this web site: http://www.wegivebooks.org/resources.The activity that I liked the best is an Information Text Scavenger Hunt.

Two websites you might be interested in looking at are ReadWorks and LearnZillion. These websites are correlated to common core. Teachers will have to register for both of these, but they are free. 

My very favorite online reading resource is Mrs. P Magic Library. When you first click on a story to have read to you, Mrs. P introduces the story and then makes a connection to it. I love listening to the way she reads the stories.

There are many more online reading resources that are free for teachers and students.

image created in Wordle